Archive for the 'Uncategorized' Category

San Diego Zoo’s Panda Cub, “All Mine and I’m Not Sharing!”

Posted at 11:15 pm December 18, 2012 by PR
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
DEC. 18, 2012
CONTACT:    SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL
                   PUBLIC RELATIONS
                   619-685-3291
WEBSITE:
    www.sandiegozoo.org
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PHOTO NEWS RELEASE
San Diego Zoo’s Panda Cub, “All Mine and I’m Not Sharing!”

     The San Diego Zoo’s panda cub, Xiao Liwu, was eager to play with a plastic ball during his 18th exam this morning and made it clear that he did not want to share his new toy by holding onto the ball tightly. Panda keepers gave the cub the new toy to test his coordination and encourage him to play with new objects.
 
     The 20-week-old panda weighed 14.5 pounds this morning when he was brought in for his weekly veterinary exam and is on track with other giant pandas born at the San Diego Zoo.
 
    Only 1,600 giant pandas are believed to exist in the wild, and the species is primarily threatened by habitat loss. San Diego Zoo Global, in conjunction with giant panda experts from the People’s Republic of China, continues to work on science-based panda conservation programs at the Zoo and in China.

Photo taken on Dec. 18, 2012, by Ken Bohn, San Diego Zoo.


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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PERMITTED USE: Images are provided to the media solely for reproduction, public display, and distribution in a professional journalistic context in connection with newspaper, magazine, broadcast media (radio, television) or Internet media (ad enabled blog, webcasts, webinars, podcasts). Images may not be made available for public or commercial download, licensing or sale.
REQUIRED CREDIT AND CAPTION: All image uses must bear the copyright notice and be properly credited to the relevant photographer, as shown in this metadata, and must be accompanied by a caption that makes reference to the giant panda cub. Any uses in which the image appears without proper copyright notice, photographer credit and a caption referencing the San Diego Zoo are subject to paid licensing.

Jaguar Cub Tempts Mom to Play

Posted at 11:05 pm June 20, 2012 by PR
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
JUNE 20, 2012
CONTACT:   SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL
                   PUBLIC RELATIONS
                   619-685-3291
WEBSITE:
    www.sandiegozoo.org
 
 

PHOTO NEWS RELEASE
Jaguar Cub Tempts Mom to Play

 

     Is that all you got?  – A jaguar cub bats at his full grown mother playfully while she stands protectively over him.  The mother jaguar, named Nindiri, brought her two cubs out of their den yesterday.   For the last two months, the young cubs, who were born April 26,  have been living in the cave area at the Harry and Grace Steele Elephant Odyssey Exhibit that serves as their den.

 
     The move to an outdoor area is a big one for the little jaguars.  They are taking their time, getting comfortable with the new smells and sounds as they carefully venture out.
 
     Although this youngster may look adorable, jaguars can range from 70 to 249 pounds. Jaguars are the largest cat in the Western Hemisphere and the third largest of the world’s cats. The South American native word for jaguar, yaguara, means “animal that kills in a single bound.”

Photo taken on June 20, 2012, by Ken Bohn, San Diego Zoo.


 
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PERMITTED USE: Images are provided to the media solely for reproduction, public display, and distribution in a professional journalistic context in connection with newspaper, magazine, broadcast media (radio, television) or Internet media (ad enabled blog, webcasts, webinars, podcasts). Images may not be made available for public or commercial download, licensing or sale.
REQUIRED CREDIT AND CAPTION: All image uses must bear the copyright notice and be properly credited to the relevant photographer, as shown in this metadata, and must be accompanied by a caption that makes reference to the jaguar cubs. Any uses in which the image appears without proper copyright notice, photographer credit and a caption referencing the San Diego Zoo are subject to paid licensing.

A Barrel of Fun Arrives at San Diego Zoo

Posted at 12:45 am January 12, 2012 by PR
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
JANUARY 12, 2012
CONTACT: SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL
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619-685-3291
WEBSITE:
www.sandiegozoo.org 
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PHOTO NEWS RELEASE
A Barrel of Fun Arrives at San Diego Zoo with Addition of Capuchin Monkeys

     A tufted capuchin monkey grooms another in their new exhibit at the San Diego Zoo. Six males and nine females – ranging in age from 1 to 35 years – have added some excitement to the Zoo’s Lost Forest with their high-energy antics. They can be seen moving from one climbing structure to another using their prehensile tails. The capuchin group, also called a barrel of monkeys, was part of a behavioral study at the Atlanta-based Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, where primatologists observed their behavior to learn more about their complex social interactions including altruism and facial recognition before coming to San Diego. Capuchin monkeys can recognize and remember those they’ve encountered in the past.

Photo taken on Jan. 12, 2012, by Ken Bohn, San Diego Zoo.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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PERMITTED USE: Images are provided to the media solely for reproduction, public display, and distribution in a professional journalistic context in connection with newspaper, magazine, broadcast media (radio, television) or Internet media (ad enabled blog, webcasts, webinars, podcasts). Images may not be made available for public or commercial download, licensing or sale.
REQUIRED CREDIT AND CAPTION: All image uses must bear the copyright notice and be properly credited to the relevant photographer, as shown in this metadata, and must be accompanied by a caption that makes reference to the San Diego Zoo. Any uses in which the image appears without proper copyright notice, photographer credit and a caption referencing the San Diego Zoo are subject to paid licensing.

Thanksgiving Pie Not Necessary, Pumpkins Will Do at San Diego Zoo

Posted at 9:44 pm November 25, 2011 by PR
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
NOVEMBER 25, 2011
CONTACT: SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL
PUBLIC RELATIONS
619-685-3291
WEBSITE:
www.sandiegozoo.org
 
 
PHOTO NEWS RELEASE
Thanksgiving Pie Not Necessary, Pumpkins Will Do at San Diego Zoo
     Who needs pumpkin pie when you can have fresh pumpkins? A Galapagos tortoise at the San Diego Zoo couldn’t resist the temptation of the seasonal fruit eating every last piece of the pumpkin, seeds and all. Keepers say the 17 tortoises, weighing 400 to 600 pounds, love pumpkins and are very attracted to their bright orange skin. Some of the tortoises arrived at the Zoo in 1928 as adults and are estimated to be up to 130 years old. The Zoo’s breeding program has produced more than 90 tortoise hatchlings, and the Zoo now has one of the largest colonies of Galápagos tortoises in the world, outside of the Ecuadorian Islands.

Photo taken Nov. 25, 2011, by Ken Bohn, San Diego Zoo.

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Paca Named Poco Lights Up Nursery

Posted at 6:33 pm October 3, 2011 by PR

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
SEPT. 30, 2011
CONTACT:SAN DIEGO ZOO SAFARI PARK
PUBLIC RELATIONS
619-685-3291
WEBSITE:
   www.sdzsafaripark.org 

PHOTO NEWS RELEASE
Paca Named Poco Lights Up Nursery at San Diego Zoo Safari Park

     An affectionate lowland paca named Poco investigates the nursery – and a photographer- at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park.  This is the first time a paca has been hand raised at the San Diego Zoo or the Safari Park. Keepers hope he will one day be an animal ambassador, who does education programs at the Safari Park. The affect rodent was born Sept. 7, 2011.
     “He’s getting bottles four times a day of formula that mimics his mom’s milk,” said Kim Millspaugh, a senior keeper.  “From Day 1 he also was eating solids and he enjoys almonds, figs, and green bell peppers. His favorite is oranges.”
     Guests can see the baby paca, which looks a bit like a spotted watermelon on short legs, in the nursery called the Animal Care Center.

     Photo taken Sept. 30, 2011, by Ken Bohn, San Diego Zoo Safari Park.

 
 

    

 The 1,800-acre San Diego Zoo Safari Park (historically referred to as Wild Animal Park) is operated by the not-for-profit San Diego Zoo and includes a 900-acre native species reserve. The organization focuses on conservation and research work around the globe, educates millions of individuals a year about wildlife and maintains accredited horticultural, animal, library and photo collections.  The Zoo also manages the San Diego Zoo and the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research.  The important conservation and science work of these entities is supported in part by The Foundation of the Zoological Society of San Diego. 
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San Diego Zoo Safari Park Invites Children to “Race” a Cheetah

Posted at 11:06 pm September 28, 2011 by PR
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
SEPT. 28, 2011
CONTACT:SAN DIEGO ZOO SAFARI PARK PUBLIC RELATIONS
619-685-3291
WEBSITE:
   www.sandiegozoo.org 

PHOTO NEWS RELEASE

San Diego Zoo Safari Park Invites Children to “Race” a Cheetah
During October Kids Free Events

     Bryanna Chrislock of Chula Vista, Calif., sprints down the Shiley’s Cheetah Run track at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park on Tuesday. During the Park’s “Kids Free” event, every day in October, weather permitting, one child at Cheetah Run will be given the chance to see how their running speed compares to the fastest land mammal. The young volunteer will run before the cheetah takes to the track and will be timed by the animal trainers. Participants will wear a special racing bib they can keep as a memento of their experience.
 
     Kids Free celebrates the founding of the San Diego Zoo in October 1916 and offers children 11 years old and younger free admission to the Zoo and the Park every day of the month.
 
     Cheetah Run gives Park guests the opportunity to witness the world’s fastest land mammal do what it does best – run! The cheetah runs off-leash, chasing a mechanical lure down a 330-foot track, showcasing its ability to go from 0 to 70 mph in just 4 seconds. Guests can line up along the track for a chance to be just feet away from this amazing exhibition of speed.
 
     Allowing kids to “race” at Cheetah Run is just one of many special experiences planned for “Kids Free” at the Zoo and Safari Park. Both locations offer the opportunity to observe amazing creatures, experience a fun day with family and learn what needs to be done to save animals from extinction.
 
     Kids Free is offered during the entire month of October. The Zoo and the Park are open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., but for opening weekend only, the Zoo will be open until 6 p.m. on October 1 and 2. Children under the age of 15 must be accompanied by a paid adult during their visit to the San Diego Zoo and the San Diego Zoo Safari Park.
 
     The 1,800-acre San Diego Zoo Safari Park (historically referred to as Wild Animal Park) is operated by the not-for-profit San Diego Zoo and includes a 900-acre native species reserve. The organization focuses on conservation and research work around the globe, educates millions of individuals a year about wildlife and maintains accredited horticultural, animal, library and photo collections.  The Zoo also manages the San Diego Zoo and the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research.  The important conservation and science work of these entities is supported in part by The Foundation of the Zoological Society of San Diego.
 
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Photo taken Sept. 28, 2011, by Ken Bohn, San Diego Zoo Safari Park.

Elephant Calf Born at San Diego Zoo Safari Park

Posted at 10:44 pm September 27, 2011 by PR
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
SEPTEMBER 26, 2011
CONTACT: SAN DIEGO ZOO
PUBLIC RELATIONS
619-685-3291
WEB SITE:
www.sdzsafaripark.org 
 
PHOTO NEWS RELEASE
ELEPHANT CALF BORN AT SAN DIEGO ZOO SAFARI PARK
A newborn Africa elephant lifted his trunk in search of his mother at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park. The male calf was born at 5:45 a.m. on Monday to Umngani (oom-gah-nee). In this rare moment, the calf stood alone after he had wandered off a few steps, but shortly thereafter his mother, 5-year-old sister Khosi (koh-see), and 2-year-old brother Ingadze (in-Gahd-zee) rushed over to tend to the unnamed calf. Throughout the day the family watched over their newest member, letting him only stray a few feet. The Safari Park is now home to 18 elephants8 adults and 10 youngsters. The adults were rescued in 2003 from the Kingdom of Swaziland, where they faced being culled. The average gestation period for African elephants is 649 days or 22 months. A newborn calf averages 200 to 300 pounds. Calves can be weaned at 2 to 3 years old.

Photo taken Sept. 26, 2011, by Ken Bohn, San Diego Zoo Safari Park.

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Red Panda Greets Guests at Debut of San Diego Zoo’s New Exhibit

Posted at 4:05 pm August 10, 2011 by PR

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
AUGUST 9, 2011
CONTACT: SAN DIEGO ZOO
PUBLIC RELATIONS
619-685-3291
WEB SITE: www.sandiegozoo.org

 

PHOTO NEWS RELEASE
RED PANDA GREETS GUESTS AT DEBUT OF SAN DIEGO ZOO’S NEW EXHIBIT

Visitors to the San Diego Zoo on Tuesday were surprised with a special treat: views of Lily, a female red panda, exploring her surroundings during the opening of the new ¾-acre Panda Trek exhibit. The $2 million project created new living space that mimics China’s bamboo forest for the red panda as well as seven Sichuan takins that also moved into their new exhibit on Tuesday. Meandering past these animals, as well as eight species of bamboo, visitors will learn more about the diversity of plants and animals found within the giant panda’s forest home before reaching the black-and-white bear. The giant panda shares its native habitat with the red panda. Like the bear, the red panda’s diet consists mostly of bamboo. However, the red panda will eat fruit, roots, acorns and eggs. Both are classified as carnivores.

Photo taken Aug. 9, 2011, by Ken Bohn, San Diego Zoo.

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THERE’S NO MONKEYING AROUND AT THE SAN DIEGO ZOO WHEN THIS LITTLE GAL IS HUNGRY

Posted at 11:38 pm July 15, 2011 by PR
 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
JULY 15, 2011
CONTACT:SAN DIEGO ZOO
PUBLIC RELATIONS
619-685-3291
WEBSITE:
www.sandiegozoo.org
 
 

PHOTO NEWS RELEASE
THERE’S NO MONKEYING AROUND AT THE SAN DIEGO ZOO WHEN THIS LITTLE GAL IS HUNGRY
Small, Orange Baby Needs A Few Bottles Each Day

     A one-week-old silver leaf monkey benefits from a little human care at the San Diego Zoo.  The female named “Thai” was born on July 3 to a first-time mother. Unfortunately Thai’s mother was not holding the newborn in a way that allowed her to nurse naturally, so animal care staff intervened and are bottle-feeding the baby several times each day.  The small, orange monkey continues to spend time with her family between feedings so that social bonds remain strong.
     The 100-acre San Diego Zoo is dedicated to the conservation of endangered species and their habitats. The organization focuses on conservation and research work around the globe, educates millions of individuals a year about wildlife and maintains accredited horticultural, animal, library and photo collections.  The Zoo also manages the 1,800-acre San Diego Zoo Safari Park (historically referred to as the Wild Animal Park), which includes a 900-acre native species reserve, and the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research.  The important conservation and science work of these entities is supported in part by The Foundation of the Zoological Society of San Diego. 
 
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Photo taken July 15, 2011 by Tammy Spratt, San Diego Zoo

 
 
 
 

Posted at 3:54 pm July 14, 2011 by PR
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
JULY 13, 2011
CONTACT:SAN DIEGO ZOO
PUBLIC RELATIONS
619-685-3291
WEBSITE:
   www.sandiegozoo.org 
 
PHOTO NEWS RELEASE
TINY TAKIN TAKIN’ TRAINERS’ HEARTS
San Diego Zoo Welcomes Its 51st Takin

Even though this one-week-old Sichuan takin isn’t eating solid food, she’s ready to learn, and on Wednesday (July 10, 2011) she mimicked her mom chewing acacia. The calf was born on July 5, 2011. She was named Duli, which means “independence” in Mandarin, because she was born so close to the Fourth of July.  Duli is the 51st takin to call the Zoo home.  Her mother is Blondie. 

“She’s just adorable,” said Bob Cisneros, a San Diego Zoo animal care supervisor. “And it’s really special for us because it’s been at least a couple of years since we had a girl.”

The first Sichuan takin born outside of China was born at the San Diego Zoo in 1989. Takins are a type of hoofed mammal that is sometimes referred to as a goat antelope because it has characteristics in common with both species.

Duli weighs about 20 pounds, while adult takins at the Zoo have weighed up to 880 pounds. The tiny takin has been exploring and climbing around her enclosure and getting to know the other seven takins in her herd. Over the next few months, her horns will come through and her coat will get lighter in color, longer and shaggier. Young takins are much darker than adults to protect them from predators in the forest.

Takins, which are considered an endangered species by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), live in the bamboo forests of China and the eastern Himalayan Mountains of Asia. They are skilled climbers and migrate to forage for food. The main cause of their declining numbers in the wild is loss of habitat due to farming, logging and mining operations. China has given the takin full protection under its laws, which is the same protection given to giant pandas.

The 100-acre San Diego Zoo is dedicated to the conservation of endangered species and their habitats. The organization focuses on conservation and research work around the globe, educates millions of individuals a year about wildlife and maintains accredited horticultural, animal, library and photo collections.  The Zoo also manages the 1,800-acre San Diego Zoo Safari Park (historically referred to as the Wild Animal Park), which includes a 900-acre native species reserve, and the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research.  The important conservation and science work of these entities is supported in part by The Foundation of the Zoological Society of San Diego. 
Photo taken July 13, 2011, by Tammy Spratt, San Diego Zoo