Archive for the 'Conservation Research' Category

San Diego Zoo Global Joins Cheetah Breeding Coalition

Posted at 10:52 pm December 3, 2013 by PR

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Dec. 3, 2013
CONTACT:   San Diego Zoo Global Public Relations
                  619-685-3291
WEBSITE:
    www.sandiegozoo.org
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PHOTO NEWS RELEASE
San Diego Zoo Global Joins Cheetah Breeding Coalition
National Coalition Includes Eight Other Organizations

     Noka, a 13-year-old male cheetah, is perched in a tree investigating the exhibit of a female cheetah. This is one of the first steps in introducing male and female cheetahs for breeding. Noka is one of 16 cheetahs in an off-exhibit breeding facility at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park.

 
     San Diego Zoo Global, which has been breeding cheetahs for more than 40 years, yielding more than 130 cubs, has recently joined the national cheetah Breeding Center Coalition (BCC) to create a sustainable cheetah population that will prevent extinction of the world’s fastest land animal. In addition to the nine breeding facilities, it is expected that more than 100 other organizations accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums that already house cheetahs will also join this coalition in a nonbreeding capacity.
 
     The nine-member coalition’s goal is to achieve a sustainable zoo population of cheetahs within 10 years. To achieve this goal, the facilities have set a target of 15 cheetah cub litters to be born each year. A typical cheetah litter has about three cubs, which would total 45 cubs per year among the nine breeding centers.
 
Photo taken on Dec. 3, 2013, by Ken Bohn, San Diego Zoo.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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PERMITTED USE: Images are provided to the media solely for reproduction, public display, and distribution in a professional journalistic context in connection with newspaper, magazine, broadcast media (radio, television) or Internet media (ad enabled blog, webcasts, webinars, podcasts). Images may not be made available for public or commercial download, licensing or sale.REQUIRED CREDIT AND CAPTION: All image uses must bear the copyright notice and be properly credited to the relevant photographer, as shown in this metadata, and must be accompanied by a caption that makes reference to the cheetah. Any uses in which the image appears without proper copyright notice, photographer credit and a caption referencing the San Diego Zoo are subject to paid licensing.

Posted at 10:16 pm September 10, 2013 by PR
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Sept. 10, 2013
CONTACT:    San Diego Zoo Global
                    Public Relations
                    619-685-3291
                    publicrelations@sandiegozoo.org
WEBSITE:     www.sandiegozoo.org
 
 
Photo News Release
San Diego Zoo Global Marks Milestone with First Hatching of Jamaican Iguana
Zoo Part of Global Team Preserving Critically Endangered Species
 
     An 11-day-old Jamaican iguana is held by Jeff Lemm, a senior research coordinator for the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research. This iguana’s arrival marks the first time this species has been successfully bred at the Institute. The successful hatching of a Jamaican iguana is also a milestone for San Diego Zoo Global because it has now successfully bred the world’s three most endangered lizard species - Grand Cayman iguana, Anegada iguana and the Jamaican iguana.
 
     Jamaican iguanas are found only in the tropical dry forests of the Hellshire Hills outside of Kingstown, Jamaica. They are the largest native animal in Jamaica and were believed to be extinct in the 1940s. However, in 1990, a pig hunter’s dog captured an iguana, which was then brought to the Hope Zoo in Kingston.  That same year, a survey of the Hellshire Hills found a small population of fewer than 100 iguanas, and researchers began a large-scale program to try to save the iguana from extinction. However, due to deforestation and the infestation of non-native animals like mongooses, cats, dogs and pigs, the Jamaican iguana is listed as critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.
 
     San Diego Zoo Global is one of several organizations in North America working to produce a captive, self-sustaining population of Jamaican iguanas to ensure genetic diversity for the species’ worldwide population. The male iguana that hatched on August 30, 2013, is a second-generation captive-bred animal. His parents hatched in the first successful breeding of the species at the Indianapolis Zoo in 2006.
 
Photo taken on September 10, 2013, by Ken Bohn, San Diego Zoo Global
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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PERMITTED USE: Images are provided to the media solely for reproduction, public display, and distribution in a professional journalistic context in connection with newspaper, magazine, broadcast media (radio, television) or Internet media (ad enabled blog, webcasts, webinars, podcasts). Images may not be made available for public or commercial download, licensing or sale.REQUIRED CREDIT AND CAPTION: All image uses must bear the copyright notice and be properly credited to the relevant photographer, as shown in this metadata, and must be accompanied by a caption that makes reference to the Jamaican iguana. Any uses in which the image appears without proper copyright notice, photographer credit and a caption referencing the San Diego Zoo and koalas are subject to paid licensing.
 

Endangered Pacific Pocket Mouse Has Late-night Lettuce

Posted at 11:11 pm September 5, 2013 by PR
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Sept. 5, 2013
CONTACT:   San Diego Zoo Global
                   Public Relations
                   619-685-3291
publicrelations@sandiegozoo.org
WEBSITE:     www.sandiegozoo.org
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Photo News Release

Endangered Pacific Pocket Mouse Has Late-night Lettuce

    A critically endangered Pacific pocket mouse nibbles on lettuce at an off-exhibit breeding facility at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park. This animal is a part of the first-ever breeding program for the native-California species, which has yielded five litters of pups since June.
 
    These nocturnal animals, which weigh less than 9 grams, usually eat seeds and are known to eat insects. They don’t drink water but rather get their hydration from the water in the vegetation they eat.
 
    The breeding of the Pacific pocket mouse is managed by the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Scientists working on the breeding program expect to increase the overall population and also maintain genetic diversity in the species.

Photos taken at 8 p.m. on Sept. 4, 2013, by Tammy Spratt, San Diego Zoo Global


 
 
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PERMITTED USE: Images are provided to the media solely for reproduction, public display, and distribution in a professional journalistic context in connection with newspaper, magazine, broadcast media (radio, television) or Internet media (ad enabled blog, webcasts, webinars, podcasts). Images may not be made available for public or commercial download, licensing or sale.

REQUIRED CREDIT AND CAPTION: All image uses must bear the copyright notice and be properly credited to the relevant photographer, as shown in this metadata, and must be accompanied by a caption that makes reference to the Pacific pocket mouse. Any uses in which the image appears without proper copyright notice, photographer credit and a caption referencing the San Diego Zoo and koalas are subject to paid licensing.

San Diego Zoo Researcher Nominated for Prestigious Award

Posted at 10:19 pm August 28, 2013 by PR
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE            
August 28, 2013
CONTACT:   SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL
                   PUBLIC RELATIONS
                   619-685-3291
WEBSITE:
    www.sandiegozooglobal.org
 
 
 
 

PRESS RELEASE
San Diego Zoo Researcher Nominated for Prestigious Award

  

     San Diego Zoo Global’s director of applied animal ecology, Ronald Swaisgood, Ph.D., has been nominated to receive the biennial Indianapolis Prize, the world’s leading award for animal conservation. Swaisgood is one of 39 conservationists nominated, all of whom have dedicated their lives to saving the Earth’s endangered species. The winner will receive an unrestricted $250,000 cash award and the Lilly Medal. Five other finalists will receive $10,000.
 
     Swaisgood is a trained field biologist who oversees San Diego Zoo Global’s recovery programs for species such as California condors, burrowing owls, Caribbean rock iguanas, mountain yellow-legged frogs, giant pandas, rhinoceros, kangaroo rats and Pacific pocket mice. 
 
     “The current nominees are exceptional and they represent many of the most significant wildlife conservationists working in the field today,” said Michael Crowther, president and CEO of the Indianapolis Zoo, which initiated the Indianapolis Prize as part of its core mission. “Increasingly more species are at risk of extinction, and these heroes deserve our recognition and support for their expertise, accomplishments, and tireless efforts protecting them. We encourage people around the world to celebrate the nominees’ important work and to join them in advancing animal conservation.”
 
     The San Diego Zoo Global Wildlife Conservancy is dedicated to bringing endangered species back from the brink of extinction. The Conservancy makes possible the wildlife conservation efforts (representing both plants and animals) of the San Diego Zoo, San Diego Zoo Safari Park, San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, and international field programs in more than 35 countries. The important conservation and science work of these entities is supported in part by The Foundation of the Zoological Society of San Diego.

Teeny Steps: Captive Breeding of Pacific Pocket Mice Yields 12 Pups

Posted at 11:15 pm August 14, 2013 by PR
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
August 14, 2013
CONTACT:   San Diego Zoo Global
                   Public Relations
                   619-685-3291
                   publicrelations@sandiegozoo.org
WEBSITE:     www.sandiegozoo.org
 
 
Photo News Release

Teeny Steps: Captive Breeding of Pacific Pocket Mice Yields 12 Pups

     Two Pacific pocket mouse pups that ventured away from their mother were photographed outside of their artificial burrow during the night of Aug. 13. The week-old offspring, which weigh just one gram each, are typically found with their mother and two other siblings nesting inside a four-ounce baby food jar but become more active at night. The jar and PVC pipe are designed to mimic the tunnels and burrows the Pacific pocket mice would dig in the wild.
 
     These pups and their mother are part of a captive breeding program for this critically endangered species managed by staff at the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. During this inaugural breeding season four females have given birth to a total of 12 offspring.
 
     This is the first time scientists have tried to breed this species in captivity. The Pacific pocket mouse, thought to be extinct in the 1980s, was rediscovered in 1993 and today exists at just three sites along the California coast. Scientists working on the captive breeding program for the Pacific pocket mouse expect to increase the overall population and also maintain genetic diversity in the species.

Photo taken on Aug. 13, 2013, by Ken Bohn, San Diego Zoo.

                  
 
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PERMITTED USE: Images are provided to the media solely for reproduction, public display, and distribution in a professional journalistic context in connection with newspaper, magazine, broadcast media (radio, television) or Internet media (ad enabled blog, webcasts, webinars, podcasts). Images may not be made available for public or commercial download, licensing or sale.

REQUIRED CREDIT AND CAPTION: All image uses must bear the copyright notice and be properly credited to the relevant photographer, as shown in this metadata, and must be accompanied by a caption that makes reference to the Pacific pocket mouse. Any uses in which the image appears without proper copyright notice, photographer credit and a caption referencing the San Diego Zoo and koalas are subject to paid licensing.

 

Captive-bred Mountain Yellow-legged Frogs Released into Native Habitat

Posted at 9:32 pm June 13, 2013 by PR
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
JUNE 13, 2013
CONTACT:  SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL
                 PUBLIC RELATIONS
                 619-685-3291
WEBSITE:
  www.sandiegozoo.org 
 
 
 
 
PHOTO NEWS RELEASE

Captive-bred Mountain Yellow-legged Frogs Released into Native Habitat

     Researcher Frank Santana stands in Indian Creek preparing to release young, endangered mountain yellow-legged frogs. The froglets were bred and raised by Santana and other research staff at the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research for a year before they were released on June 12, 2013. Some of the froglets released were fitted with radio transmitters so researchers can track and monitor the frogs and begin to understand the activities of this endangered species. 
     The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the mountain yellow-legged frog of southern California as endangered in 2002. Reduced to fewer than 200 individuals by 2003, efforts to boost the species’ population have included captive breeding, reintroducing captive offspring to historic habitat and conducting scientific research into the causes of the species’ decline.
 
     Watched over by a team of federal, state, and private scientists, the mountain yellow-legged frog continues to maintain a perilous toehold in the mountains of southern California. Mountain yellow-legged frogs live in perennial streams in portions of the San Gabriel, San Bernardino and San Jacinto mountains in southern California.

Photo taken on June 12, 2013, by Ken Bohn, San Diego Zoo Global


 
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PERMITTED USE: Images are provided to the media solely for reproduction, public display, and distribution in a professional journalistic context in connection with newspaper, magazine, broadcast media (radio, television) or Internet media (ad enabled blog, webcasts, webinars, podcasts). Images may not be made available for public or commercial download, licensing or sale.
REQUIRED CREDIT AND CAPTION: All image uses must bear the copyright notice and be properly credited to the relevant photographer, as shown in this metadata, and must be accompanied by a caption that makes reference to the mountain yellow-legged frog. Any uses in which the image appears without proper copyright notice, photographer credit and a caption referencing the San Diego Zoo Global Wildlife Conservancy are subject to paid licensing.

What Young Desert Tortoises are Wearing

Posted at 12:22 am September 22, 2012 by PR
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
SEPTEMBER 21, 2012
CONTACT:SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL
PUBLIC RELATIONS
619-685-3291
WEBSITE:
    www.sandiegozooglobal.org 
 
Photo Release
What Young Desert Tortoises are Wearing
     Researcher, Jennifer Germano Ph.D., looks at the transmitter worn by a juvenile tortoise before releasing it into the desert in southern Nevada.  On Friday, September 21, a team of conservationists translocated 60 juvenile tortoises into a large protected habitat area.  The project is part of a long-term collaborative effort involving U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Nevada National Security Site and San Diego Zoo Global to learn about and recover a species that has become threatened in the wild. A transmitter has been placed on each of the tortoises to allow researchers to track the movements and health of the juvenile reptiles (ranging in age from 3 to 8 years).
 
     The San Diego Zoo Global Wildlife Conservancy is dedicated to bringing endangered species back from the brink of extinction. The work of the Conservancy includes onsite wildlife conservation efforts (representing both plants and animals) at the San Diego Zoo, San Diego Zoo Safari Park, San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, and international field programs in more than 35 countries. In addition, San Diego Zoo Global manages the Anne and Kenneth Griffin Reptile Conservation Center, the Frozen ZooTM, Native Seed Gene Bank, the Keauhou and Maui Hawaii Endangered Bird Conservation Centers, the San Clemente Loggerhead Shrike Breeding Facility, the Cocha Cashu Biological Research Station, the Desert Tortoise Conservation Center, and a 800-acre biodiversity reserve adjacent to the San Diego Zoo Safari Park. The important conservation and science work of these entities is supported in part by The Foundation of the Zoological Society of San Diego.

Photo taken on Sept. 21, 2012, by Tammy Spratt, San Diego Zoo Global

 
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PERMITTED USE: Images are provided to the media solely for reproduction, public display, and distribution in a professional journalistic context in connection with newspaper, magazine, broadcast media (radio, television) or Internet media (ad enabled blog, webcasts, webinars, podcasts). Images may not be made available for public or commercial download, licensing or sale.
REQUIRED CREDIT AND CAPTION: All image uses must bear the copyright notice and be properly credited to the relevant photographer, as shown in this metadata, and must be accompanied by a caption that makes reference to the desert tortoises. Any uses in which the image appears without proper copyright notice, photographer credit and a caption referencing the San Diego Zoo Global are subject to paid licensing.

California Condor Chick Passes First Vet Exam at San Diego Zoo Safari Park

Posted at 12:04 am April 24, 2012 by PR
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
APRIL 23, 2012
CONTACT:   SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL
                             PUBLIC RELATIONS
                             619-685-3291
WEBSITE:
    www.sandiegozooglobal.org
 
 
 
PHOTO NEWS RELEASE
California Condor Chick Passes First Vet Exam at San Diego Zoo Safari Park
     After its first veterinary check up on Monday, Saticoy, the San Diego Zoo Safari Park’s 6-week-old California condor, settled quickly back into the nest. Until today, Safari Park keepers and veterinarians had only observed the chick through Condor Cam (www.sandiegozooglobal.org/video/condor_cam), just like Saticoy’s loyal followers, who have watched the chick, noting the growth of its secondary and darker feathers and seeing the chick increase to the size of a bowling ball that weighs 8 pounds. Veterinarians administered a routine West Nile Virus vaccination to protect the chick from the disease, inserted a small microchip for identification, similar to those domestic dogs and cats carry, and took a small blood sample to run a complete blood evaluation. The sample will also be used to identify whether the chick is a male or female, and the results will take several days. Since the California Condor Recovery Program began in the 1980s, when there were only 22 condors left in the world, the Safari Park has hatched 174 chicks and released more than 80 condors in the wild. Today, there are approximately 386 condors, more than half of which are flying free in California, Arizona and Baja California, Mexico.Photo taken on April 23, 2012, by Ken Bohn, San Diego Zoo Safari Park.
 
 
 
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PERMITTED USE: Images are provided to the media solely for reproduction, public display, and distribution in a professional journalistic context in connection with newspaper, magazine, broadcast media (radio, television) or Internet media (ad enabled blog, webcasts, webinars, podcasts). Images may not be made available for public or commercial download, licensing or sale.
REQUIRED CREDIT AND CAPTION: All image uses must bear the copyright notice and be properly credited to the relevant photographer, as shown in this metadata, and must be accompanied by a caption that makes reference to the California condor. Any uses in which the image appears without proper copyright notice, photographer credit and a caption referencing the San Diego Zoo Safari Park are subject to paid licensing.

California Condor Hatches on San Diego Zoo Global’s Cam Before Thousands

Posted at 4:48 pm March 13, 2012 by PR
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
MARCH 12, 2012
CONTACT: SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL
PUBLIC RELATIONS
619-685-3291
WEBSITE:
www.sdzsafaripark.org
 
 
 
 
PHOTO NEWS RELEASE
California Condor Hatches on San Diego Zoo Global’s Cam before Thousands
 
     Ron Webb, a San Diego Zoo Safari Park senior keeper, monitors a California condor chick on Monday, two days after it hatched on the San Diego Zoo Global Wildlife Conservancy’s Condor Cam for a live, world-wide audience. For decades, field biologists, behaviorists and zookeepers were the only people able to witness a condor chick hatch or see parental behavior. Condor Cam (www.sandiegozooglobal.org/video/condor_cam) made it possible for the public to see this endangered species hatch in real time for the first time. People as far away as England, Scotland and France watched the chick hatch on Saturday. Suggest a name, in the Chumash language, for the chick by posting it on the Wildlife Conservancy’s Facebook wall at www.facebook.com/sdzglobal or by tweeting it to www.twitter.com/sdzglobal and using the hashtag #CondorName. Suggestions will be accepted through March 15.

Photo taken on March 12, 2012, by Ken Bohn, San Diego Zoo Safari Park.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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PERMITTED USE: Images are provided to the media solely for reproduction, public display, and distribution in a professional journalistic context in connection with newspaper, magazine, broadcast media (radio, television) or Internet media (ad enabled blog, webcasts, webinars, podcasts). Images may not be made available for public or commercial download, licensing or sale.
REQUIRED CREDIT AND CAPTION: All image uses must bear the copyright notice and be properly credited to the relevant photographer, as shown in this metadata, and must be accompanied by a caption that makes reference to the condor chick. Any uses in which the image appears without proper copyright notice, photographer credit and a caption referencing the San Diego Zoo Global Wildlife Conservancy are subject to paid licensing.

California Condor Chick Ready to Hatch on San Diego Zoo Global’s Web Cam

Posted at 5:39 pm March 9, 2012 by PR

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                                                                                                                      
MARCH 8, 2012
CONTACT: SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL
PUBLIC RELATIONS
619-685-3291
WEBSITE: www.sdzsafaripark.org

 
 
 
 
 
PHOTO NEWS RELEASE
California Condor Chick Ready to Hatch on San Diego Zoo Globals Web Cam

     A California condor chick is making history as it begins the hatching process at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park. The chick began to pip – or break through the egg shell – on Thursday. The egg will hatch live on the San Diego Zoo Global Wildlife Conservancy’s Condor Cam in the next 48 to 72 hours. For decades, field biologists, behaviorists and zookeepers were the only people able to witness a condor chick hatch or see parental behavior. Condor Cam (www.sandiegozooglobal.org/video/condor_cam) gives the public the first-ever opportunity to see all of this live. Suggest a name, in the Chumash language, for the chick by posting it on the Wildlife Conservancy’s Facebook wall at www.facebook.com/sdzglobal or by tweeting it to www.twitter.com/sdzglobaland using the hashtag #CondorName. Suggestions will be accepted through March 15.Photo taken on March 8, 2012, by Tammy Spratt, San Diego Zoo Safari Park.

 
 
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PERMITTED USE: Images are provided to the media solely for reproduction, public display, and distribution in a professional journalistic context in connection with newspaper, magazine, broadcast media (radio, television) or Internet media (ad enabled blog, webcasts, webinars, podcasts). Images may not be made available for public or commercial download, licensing or sale.
REQUIRED CREDIT AND CAPTION: All image uses must bear the copyright notice and be properly credited to the relevant photographer, as shown in this metadata, and must be accompanied by a caption which makes reference to the condor egg. Any uses in which the image appears without proper copyright notice, photographer credit and a caption referencing the San Diego Zoo Global Wildlife Conservancy are subject to paid licensing.