San Diego Zoo Public Relations

Precious Pair: Lion Siblings Thrive at San Diego Zoo Safari Park

Posted at 11:07 pm December 16, 2013 by PR
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
DEC. 16, 2013
CONTACT:   SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL
                       PUBLIC RELATIONS
                       619-685-3291
WEBSITE:
    www.sandiegozoo.org
                  
  
  
PHOTO NEWS RELEASE
 
Precious Pair: Lion Siblings Thrive at San Diego Zoo Safari Park

Male and Female Cubs Sleep, Eat, Cuddle, Play

    A pair of lion cubs born on Dec. 6 at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park cuddled Monday morning in their play area at the animal care center. The brother and sister, whose mother, Oshana, wasn’t giving them the attention they needed to thrive, are receiving bottles of kitten-starter formula every two hours from animal care staff. Today the female cub weighed 3.5 pounds and the male cub weighed 5.5 pounds after their 8 a.m. feeding. 
 
    The cubs are viewable for short periods of time at the animal care center at the Safari Park.   However, the cubs, like adult lions, are averaging about 20 hours of sleep per day. They will remain a pair and learn to be lions together. When they’re ready, animal care staff will work on training behaviors that will help staff assess their health.
    
Photo taken on Dec. 16, 2013, by Ken Bohn, San Diego Zoo.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
###
PERMITTED USE: Images are provided to the media solely for reproduction, public display, and distribution in a professional journalistic context in connection with newspaper, magazine, broadcast media (radio, television) or Internet media (ad enabled blog, webcasts, webinars, podcasts). Images may not be made available for public or commercial download, licensing or sale.REQUIRED CREDIT AND CAPTION: All image uses must bear the copyright notice and be properly credited to the relevant photographer, as shown in this metadata, and must be accompanied by a caption that makes reference to lion cubs at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park. Any uses in which the image appears without proper copyright notice, photographer credit and a caption referencing the San Diego Zoo are subject to paid licensing.

San Diego Zoo Global Joins Cheetah Breeding Coalition

Posted at 10:52 pm December 3, 2013 by PR

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Dec. 3, 2013
CONTACT:   San Diego Zoo Global Public Relations
                  619-685-3291
WEBSITE:
    www.sandiegozoo.org
DOWNLOAD PHOTO AT: https://sandiegozoo.box.com/s/w77qckmunxyjxe9virw9

 
 
 
 
 
PHOTO NEWS RELEASE
San Diego Zoo Global Joins Cheetah Breeding Coalition
National Coalition Includes Eight Other Organizations

     Noka, a 13-year-old male cheetah, is perched in a tree investigating the exhibit of a female cheetah. This is one of the first steps in introducing male and female cheetahs for breeding. Noka is one of 16 cheetahs in an off-exhibit breeding facility at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park.

 
     San Diego Zoo Global, which has been breeding cheetahs for more than 40 years, yielding more than 130 cubs, has recently joined the national cheetah Breeding Center Coalition (BCC) to create a sustainable cheetah population that will prevent extinction of the world’s fastest land animal. In addition to the nine breeding facilities, it is expected that more than 100 other organizations accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums that already house cheetahs will also join this coalition in a nonbreeding capacity.
 
     The nine-member coalition’s goal is to achieve a sustainable zoo population of cheetahs within 10 years. To achieve this goal, the facilities have set a target of 15 cheetah cub litters to be born each year. A typical cheetah litter has about three cubs, which would total 45 cubs per year among the nine breeding centers.
 
Photo taken on Dec. 3, 2013, by Ken Bohn, San Diego Zoo.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
###
 
PERMITTED USE: Images are provided to the media solely for reproduction, public display, and distribution in a professional journalistic context in connection with newspaper, magazine, broadcast media (radio, television) or Internet media (ad enabled blog, webcasts, webinars, podcasts). Images may not be made available for public or commercial download, licensing or sale.REQUIRED CREDIT AND CAPTION: All image uses must bear the copyright notice and be properly credited to the relevant photographer, as shown in this metadata, and must be accompanied by a caption that makes reference to the cheetah. Any uses in which the image appears without proper copyright notice, photographer credit and a caption referencing the San Diego Zoo are subject to paid licensing.

Awww: Mother and Daughter Sumatran Orangutans Spend Morning on Exhibit at the San Diego Zoo

Posted at 10:16 pm November 8, 2013 by PR
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
NOV. 8, 2013
CONTACT:     San Diego Zoo Global Public Relations
                    619-685-3291
WEBSITE:
    www.sandiegozoo.org
DOWNLOAD PHOTO AT: https://sandiegozoo.box.com/s/lj98zc1ybcpyelyeu6hb
 
 
PHOTO NEWS RELEASE

Awww: Mother and Daughter Sumatran Orangutans Spend Morning
on Exhibit at the San Diego Zoo

     A two-week-old, female Sumatran orangutan at the San Diego Zoo is cradled by her mother, Indah, who inspects the baby’s hands and fingers. The baby, sporting shaggy, reddish-orange hair in tufts was born with spindly arms, longer than her body, and a natural instinct to hold tightly to her mother.

 
     Indah gave birth to the baby Oct. 25 in her off-exhibit bedroom under the watchful eyes of her keepers. Animal care staff report the little primate is healthy, nursing, and being very well taken care of by her protective and attentive mother. This is the second baby born to Indah, and dad, Satu, who shares the same habitat but takes no role in caring for the youngster.
 
     The baby and her mother can be seen in their exhibit on Orangutan Trail at the San Diego Zoo. They also may be watched on the Zoos Ape cam at www.sandiegozoo.org/apecam.
 
     Orangutans are native to the Southeast Asian islands of Borneo and Sumatra. The Sumatran orangutan is critically endangered, with an estimate of less than 7,000 remaining in the wild. Their populations have declined drastically in recent years as a result of habitat conversion to palm oil plantations, over-harvesting of timber and human encroachment.

Photo taken on Nov. 8, 2013, by Ken Bohn, San Diego Zoo.


 
 
###

 
PERMITTED USE: Images are provided to the media solely for reproduction, public display, and distribution in a professional journalistic context in connection with newspaper, magazine, broadcast media (radio, television) or Internet media (ad enabled blog, webcasts, webinars, podcasts). Images may not be made available for public or commercial download, licensing or sale.

REQUIRED CREDIT AND CAPTION: All image uses must bear the copyright notice and be properly credited to the relevant photographer, as shown in this metadata, and must be accompanied by a caption that makes reference to the orangutan. Any uses in which the image appears without proper copyright notice, photographer credit and a caption referencing the San Diego Zoo are subject to paid licensing.

“Kids Free” Presented by Mission Fed Underway at San Diego Zoo and San Diego Zoo Safari Park

Posted at 11:20 pm October 1, 2013 by PR
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
OCT. 1, 2013
CONTACT:  SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL
                 PUBLIC RELATIONS
                 619-685-3291
WEB SITE:
www.sandiegozoo.org
 
PHOTO RELEASE

“Kids Free” Presented by Mission Fed Underway at
San Diego Zoo and San Diego Zoo Safari Park

October Offers Children Ages 11 and Younger Free Admission to Zoo, Safari Park

     Nindiri, a six-year-old female jaguar at the San Diego Zoo, savors a delectable treat in the form of a brain-shaped bloodsicle. The icy treat for the jaguar is a special form of enrichment. Enrichment is important for the animals in the Zoo, as it keeps them stimulated and active, allowing them to show their natural behaviors.
 
     This type of animal enrichment, along with educational shows and kid-friendly activities, await visitors to the San Diego Zoo and San Diego Zoo Safari Park in October during Kids Free presented by Mission Fed.
 
     Throughout the month of October, children 11 years old and younger receive free admission to both the Zoo and Safari Park. For more information on Kids Free presented by Mission Fed, show times and activity schedules, visit www.sandiegozoo.org/kidsfree

     Photo taken on Oct. 1, 2013, by Tammy Spratt, San Diego Zoo

 
###

PERMITTED USE: Images are provided to the media solely for reproduction, public display, and distribution in a professional journalistic context in connection with newspaper, magazine, broadcast media (radio, television) or Internet media (ad enabled blog, webcasts, webinars, podcasts). Images may not be made available for public or commercial download, licensing or sale.

REQUIRED CREDIT AND CAPTION: All image uses must bear the copyright notice and be properly credited to the relevant photographer, as shown in this metadata, and must be accompanied by a caption that makes reference to Kids Free at San Diego Zoo. Any uses in which the image appears without proper copyright notice, photographer credit and a caption referencing the San Diego Zoo are subject to paid licensing.

“Kids Free” Presented by Mission Fed Underway at San Diego Zoo and San Diego Zoo Safari Park

Posted at 10:40 pm October 1, 2013 by PR
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
OCT. 1, 2013
CONTACT:   SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL
                         PUBLIC RELATIONS
                         619-685-3291
WEB SITE:
www.sandiegozoo.org
 
 
PHOTO RELEASE

“Kids Free” Presented by Mission Fed Underway at
San Diego Zoo and San Diego Zoo Safari Park

October Offers Children Ages 11 and Younger Free Admission to Zoo, Safari Park

     A woma, a python native to central Australia, offered children visiting the San Diego Zoo a special, up-close animal encounter. This type of encounter, along with fun and educational shows, special animal enrichment, and plenty of kid-friendly activities await visitors to the San Diego Zoo and San Diego Zoo Safari Park during Kids Free presented by Mission Fed.
 
     Throughout the month of October, children 11 years old and younger receive free admission to both the San Diego Zoo and San Diego Zoo Safari Park. For more information on Kids Free presented by Mission Fed, show times and activity schedules, visit www.sandiegozoo.org/kidsfree

     Photo taken on Oct. 1, 2013, by Tammy Spratt, San Diego Zoo


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
###

PERMITTED USE: Images are provided to the media solely for reproduction, public display, and distribution in a professional journalistic context in connection with newspaper, magazine, broadcast media (radio, television) or Internet media (ad enabled blog, webcasts, webinars, podcasts). Images may not be made available for public or commercial download, licensing or sale.

REQUIRED CREDIT AND CAPTION: All image uses must bear the copyright notice and be properly credited to the relevant photographer, as shown in this metadata, and must be accompanied by a caption that makes reference to Kids Free at San Diego Zoo. Any uses in which the image appears without proper copyright notice, photographer credit and a caption referencing the San Diego Zoo are subject to paid licensing.

San Diego Zoo’s Cutest Animal Ambassador Needs Name

Posted at 10:11 pm September 16, 2013 by PR
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
SEPT. 16, 2013
CONTACT:     SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL
                     PUBLIC RELATIONS
                     619-685-3291
WEBSITE:
    www.sandiegozoo.org 
 
 
 
PHOTO NEWS RELEASE
San Diego Zoo’s Cutest Animal Ambassador Needs Name

      The youngest member of the San Diego Zoo’s animal ambassador team cuddled up close to senior keeper Katie Miller this morning during a training session. This five- month-old is a Linnaeus’s two-toed sloth and is currently being trained to meet people up close during special animal presentations and outings.

 
     The baby sloth is in need of a name and the Zoo has carefully selected four names for the public to vote on:     Xena (pronounced ZEE-nah): The taxonomic superorder Xenarthra is comprised of armadillos, sloths and anteaters.     Dulce (pronounced DUEL-say): This is Spanish for sweet

     Guiana (pronounced gee ON a): Two-toed sloths are native to this region in northeastern South America.

     Subida (pronounced soo BEE dah): In Spanish, this word means rise, increase, ascent, and way up.

    To help name this young sloth, go to the San Diego Zoo’s Facebook page or click http://bit.ly/nameoursloth.

 
     Sloths are slow-moving, solitary, arboreal, forest-dwelling nocturnal herbivores, found in tropical forests and cloud forests in Central and South America. Their sharp claws are 3 to 4 inches long and come in handy for hanging onto trees. Sloths sleep 15 to 18 hours per day and (slowly) look for food the rest of the day.
 
     Photo taken on Sept. 16, 2013, by Ken Bohn, San Diego Zoo.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
###
PERMITTED USE: Images are provided to the media solely for reproduction, public display, and distribution in a professional journalistic context in connection with newspaper, magazine, broadcast media (radio, television) or Internet media (ad enabled blog, webcasts, webinars, podcasts). Images may not be made available for public or commercial download, licensing or sale.
REQUIRED CREDIT AND CAPTION: All image uses must bear the copyright notice and be properly credited to the relevant photographer, as shown in this metadata, and must be accompanied by a caption that makes reference to the baby sloth. Any uses in which the image appears without proper copyright notice, photographer credit and a caption referencing the San Diego Zoo Safari Park are subject to paid licensing.

Posted at 10:16 pm September 10, 2013 by PR
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Sept. 10, 2013
CONTACT:    San Diego Zoo Global
                    Public Relations
                    619-685-3291
                    publicrelations@sandiegozoo.org
WEBSITE:     www.sandiegozoo.org
 
 
Photo News Release
San Diego Zoo Global Marks Milestone with First Hatching of Jamaican Iguana
Zoo Part of Global Team Preserving Critically Endangered Species
 
     An 11-day-old Jamaican iguana is held by Jeff Lemm, a senior research coordinator for the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research. This iguana’s arrival marks the first time this species has been successfully bred at the Institute. The successful hatching of a Jamaican iguana is also a milestone for San Diego Zoo Global because it has now successfully bred the world’s three most endangered lizard species - Grand Cayman iguana, Anegada iguana and the Jamaican iguana.
 
     Jamaican iguanas are found only in the tropical dry forests of the Hellshire Hills outside of Kingstown, Jamaica. They are the largest native animal in Jamaica and were believed to be extinct in the 1940s. However, in 1990, a pig hunter’s dog captured an iguana, which was then brought to the Hope Zoo in Kingston.  That same year, a survey of the Hellshire Hills found a small population of fewer than 100 iguanas, and researchers began a large-scale program to try to save the iguana from extinction. However, due to deforestation and the infestation of non-native animals like mongooses, cats, dogs and pigs, the Jamaican iguana is listed as critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.
 
     San Diego Zoo Global is one of several organizations in North America working to produce a captive, self-sustaining population of Jamaican iguanas to ensure genetic diversity for the species’ worldwide population. The male iguana that hatched on August 30, 2013, is a second-generation captive-bred animal. His parents hatched in the first successful breeding of the species at the Indianapolis Zoo in 2006.
 
Photo taken on September 10, 2013, by Ken Bohn, San Diego Zoo Global
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
###
 
PERMITTED USE: Images are provided to the media solely for reproduction, public display, and distribution in a professional journalistic context in connection with newspaper, magazine, broadcast media (radio, television) or Internet media (ad enabled blog, webcasts, webinars, podcasts). Images may not be made available for public or commercial download, licensing or sale.REQUIRED CREDIT AND CAPTION: All image uses must bear the copyright notice and be properly credited to the relevant photographer, as shown in this metadata, and must be accompanied by a caption that makes reference to the Jamaican iguana. Any uses in which the image appears without proper copyright notice, photographer credit and a caption referencing the San Diego Zoo and koalas are subject to paid licensing.
 

Cheers to You, Bai Yun! San Diego Zoo Giant Panda Matriarch Turns 22

Posted at 9:40 pm September 7, 2013 by PR

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
SEPT. 7, 2013
CONTACT:    SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL
                   PUBLIC RELATIONS
                   619-685-3291
WEBSITE:
    www.sandiegozoo.org
DOWNLOAD PHOTO AT: https://sandiegozoo.box.com/s/u750go8r276t140qoewy

 
 
 
PHOTO NEWS RELEASE

CHEERS TO YOU, BAI YUN!
San Diego Zoo Giant Panda Matriarch Turns 22
     Bai Yun (pronounced by yoon), a giant panda at the San Diego Zoo, celebrates her 22nd birthday by sifting through the ice “confetti” on her birthday cake in search of sliced apples, her favorite treat.
 
     Panda lovers filled the Zoo’s Panda Trek this morning to watch the beloved bear as she enjoyed her five-foot tall, 125-pound cake, made for Bai Yun by the Zoo’s nutritional services team. The cake, which took four weeks to build, was made of water frozen into layers and bamboo pieces were used to support the tiers. The elaborate creation featured toasting glasses and ice pieces cut into the number 22, and was decorated with bamboo leaves, sliced apples, carrots, and “icing” made of steamed yams.
 
     Bai Yun arrived at the San Diego Zoo in September 1996 on loan from China. Since her arrival at the Zoo, she has proven to be a wonderful ambassador for her species, helping researchers and keepers learn about panda behavior, pregnancy and birth, and maternal care. She has given birth to six cubs: Hua Mei in 1999, Mei Sheng in 2003, Su Lin in 2005, Zhen Zhen in 2007, Yun Zi in 2009, and Xiao Liwu in 2012. Bai Yuns own birth in 1991 was unique as well: it marked the first successful birth of a giant panda at the Wolong Giant Panda Research Center in China.

Photo taken on Sept. 7, 2013, by Tammy Spratt, San Diego Zoo.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
###

 
PERMITTED USE: Images are provided to the media solely for reproduction, public display, and distribution in a professional journalistic context in connection with newspaper, magazine, broadcast media (radio, television) or Internet media (ad enabled blog, webcasts, webinars, podcasts). Images may not be made available for public or commercial download, licensing or sale.

REQUIRED CREDIT AND CAPTION: All image uses must bear the copyright notice and be properly credited to the relevant photographer, as shown in this metadata, and must be accompanied by a caption that makes reference to the giant panda. Any uses in which the image appears without proper copyright notice, photographer credit and a caption referencing the San Diego Zoo are subject to paid licensing.

Endangered Pacific Pocket Mouse Has Late-night Lettuce

Posted at 11:11 pm September 5, 2013 by PR
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Sept. 5, 2013
CONTACT:   San Diego Zoo Global
                   Public Relations
                   619-685-3291
publicrelations@sandiegozoo.org
WEBSITE:     www.sandiegozoo.org
PHOTOS:     https://sandiegozoo.box.com/s/rpynyqvqk1uqxs4h1swd

 
Photo News Release

Endangered Pacific Pocket Mouse Has Late-night Lettuce

    A critically endangered Pacific pocket mouse nibbles on lettuce at an off-exhibit breeding facility at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park. This animal is a part of the first-ever breeding program for the native-California species, which has yielded five litters of pups since June.
 
    These nocturnal animals, which weigh less than 9 grams, usually eat seeds and are known to eat insects. They don’t drink water but rather get their hydration from the water in the vegetation they eat.
 
    The breeding of the Pacific pocket mouse is managed by the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Scientists working on the breeding program expect to increase the overall population and also maintain genetic diversity in the species.

Photos taken at 8 p.m. on Sept. 4, 2013, by Tammy Spratt, San Diego Zoo Global


 
 
###
 
PERMITTED USE: Images are provided to the media solely for reproduction, public display, and distribution in a professional journalistic context in connection with newspaper, magazine, broadcast media (radio, television) or Internet media (ad enabled blog, webcasts, webinars, podcasts). Images may not be made available for public or commercial download, licensing or sale.

REQUIRED CREDIT AND CAPTION: All image uses must bear the copyright notice and be properly credited to the relevant photographer, as shown in this metadata, and must be accompanied by a caption that makes reference to the Pacific pocket mouse. Any uses in which the image appears without proper copyright notice, photographer credit and a caption referencing the San Diego Zoo and koalas are subject to paid licensing.

San Diego Zoo Researcher Nominated for Prestigious Award

Posted at 10:19 pm August 28, 2013 by PR
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE            
August 28, 2013
CONTACT:   SAN DIEGO ZOO GLOBAL
                   PUBLIC RELATIONS
                   619-685-3291
WEBSITE:
    www.sandiegozooglobal.org
 
 
 
 

PRESS RELEASE
San Diego Zoo Researcher Nominated for Prestigious Award

  

     San Diego Zoo Global’s director of applied animal ecology, Ronald Swaisgood, Ph.D., has been nominated to receive the biennial Indianapolis Prize, the world’s leading award for animal conservation. Swaisgood is one of 39 conservationists nominated, all of whom have dedicated their lives to saving the Earth’s endangered species. The winner will receive an unrestricted $250,000 cash award and the Lilly Medal. Five other finalists will receive $10,000.
 
     Swaisgood is a trained field biologist who oversees San Diego Zoo Global’s recovery programs for species such as California condors, burrowing owls, Caribbean rock iguanas, mountain yellow-legged frogs, giant pandas, rhinoceros, kangaroo rats and Pacific pocket mice. 
 
     “The current nominees are exceptional and they represent many of the most significant wildlife conservationists working in the field today,” said Michael Crowther, president and CEO of the Indianapolis Zoo, which initiated the Indianapolis Prize as part of its core mission. “Increasingly more species are at risk of extinction, and these heroes deserve our recognition and support for their expertise, accomplishments, and tireless efforts protecting them. We encourage people around the world to celebrate the nominees’ important work and to join them in advancing animal conservation.”
 
     The San Diego Zoo Global Wildlife Conservancy is dedicated to bringing endangered species back from the brink of extinction. The Conservancy makes possible the wildlife conservation efforts (representing both plants and animals) of the San Diego Zoo, San Diego Zoo Safari Park, San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, and international field programs in more than 35 countries. The important conservation and science work of these entities is supported in part by The Foundation of the Zoological Society of San Diego.